Hands on Birmingham Needs Volunteers

HANDS ON BIRMINGHAM

HOB provides flexible, local hands-on volunteer opportunities for busy people. Last year, over 6,700 volunteers donated over 23,000 hours of hands-on service to the community.

We accomplish our mission through a guilt-free volunteering model whereby people can contribute their time and other resources when it is convenient as an individual or part of a team.

Volunteer opportunities come in many shapes and sizes depending on individual or team preferences. Volunteers can brighten a learning environment with fresh paint, organize a clothes closet, dig in the dirt, visit the elderly, tutor a child, prepare and serve a meal…use your imagination to imagine the opportunities to give back and serve others!

Get ready for summer volunteer events! Click on the link below

https://uweb1.unitedwayeservice.org/Volunteer/OpSearchResults.jsp?entry=...

Solidarity with the 50,000 UAW  union workers on strike against General Motors nationwide.

Despite its setbacks, or perhaps because of them, organized labor has an energy level that AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka says he hasn’t seen before in his 50 years with the movement.

The Union Sportsmen's Alliance is a conservation organization working to unite union members and their families who hunt, fish, shoot and enjoy the outdoors.

Federal agencies have been told to carry out Trump administration directives aimed at restricting the role of unions in the federal workplace and giving agencies the maximum discretion in taking disciplinary actions against employees, now that a court ban against many of those policies has been lifted.

A key labor leader has warned House Democrats not to expedite approval of a new North American trade deal, saying that the agreement remains far from complete and that a vote in coming weeks would be a “colossal mistake.”

It was just a decade ago that the Great Recession — the worst economic disaster since the Great Depression — upended life for hundreds of millions of Americans. More than 8 million people across the country lost their jobs. Millions more lost their homes and life savings.

The economy has made steady improvements since 2008, but recovery has disproportionately favored wealthier Americans.

One of the workshops at the Connecticut AFL-CIO’s two-day convention that opened here Thursday explored the lessons offered from “worker power resurgence,” a reference to labor’s extraordinary year of strikes and other work stoppages in 2018.

For decades, working families could depend on labor unions to represent their collective interests -- ensuring a living wage, better benefits and a voice in their workplace. Now, after 50 years of rollbacks on union and labor rights, workers have been silenced at their jobs. The Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act is an opportunity for Congress to give working families their voice back.

A decade ago, General Motors was on the verge of collapse. Facing down an earth-shattering financial crisis, tens of thousands of UAW members agreed to help save an American icon — and the economy along with it.

Autoworkers took on personal financial sacrifices, conceding contract victories that had taken years to secure. Working harder and longer for less, they ultimately carried GM out of bankruptcy and into a period of record-breaking profits.

When about 48,000 workers went on strike Monday against General Motors, they launched the largest American labor stoppage against any business since the financial crisis.

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said Wednesday it plans to shelve an Obama-era rule to collect pay data in what Democratic lawmakers and advocates said was a setback to efforts to achieve equal pay for women and people of color.